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New requirements for swimming and bathing pool water in accordance with DIN 19643-1:2012-11

New findings in the area of swimming and bathing pool water hygiene, along with technical refinement of the relevant purification procedures, have made a revision of the DIN 19643 series of standards necessary. As a result, the scope of inspection has also changed. Among other amendments, the disinfection by-products bromate, chlorite and chlorate must now also be analysed.

New requirements for swimming and bathing pool water in accordance with DIN 19643-1:2012-11

The following information is also available in our download area in the bathing pool water customer information sheet.

Introduction

New findings in the area of swimming and bathing pool water hygiene, along with technical refinement of the relevant purification procedures, have made a revision of the DIN 19643 series of standards necessary. Part 1 was published in November 2012, therefore replacing the previous version from 1997. Part 1 of this series of standards applies to the purification of water in swimming and bathing pool facilities. The aim of this document is to secure high, consistent swimming and bathing pool water quality with respect to hygiene, safety and appearance, so there are no causes for concern as to impairments to human health, especially from pathogens. At the same time, the wellbeing of bathers should also be considered (for example by minimising the side effects of disinfectants). Purification requirements have been stated, with which this goal can be achieved.

Changes to microbiological and chemical requirements

As part of this revision, the requirement to establish the colony count at 20°C was withdrawn. From now on, this will only be determined at an incubation temperature of 36°C. In respect of the legionella parameter, the measurement volume was increased from 1 millilitre to 100 millilitre. In conjunction with this, there is now only one assessment scheme for findings of legionella, which contains concrete follow-up measures.

Legionella CFU/100mlAssessmentMeasures after first testMeasures after follow-up testFurther decontamination
< 1free of detectable contamination-NONE---
1 to 100low contaminationFollow-up testFollow-up, monitor filtrateFollow-up, monitor filtrate
> 100 to 1,000medium contaminationFilter flushing, […], monitor filtrate[…], switch off aerosol-forming equipmentInform health authority
> 1,000high contamination[…], switch off aerosol-forming equipmentProhibit use […]Inform health authority […] 

Excerpt from Table 7 – Analysing the pool water and measures from DIN 19643-1:2012-11

From now on, some disinfection by-products must also be examined: bromate, chlorite and chlorate. Furthermore, there are now also stated minimum requirements for the acid capacity in pool water. If aluminium and/or flocculants containing iron are used, analyses for aluminium and/or iron are also now required.

Sample points

When carrying out routine water quality inspections, not only the pool water must be tested, but also the filling water. Both must be tested for oxidisability and nitrate, and the filtrate must be tested for colony count, E. coli, pseudominas aeruginosa and legionella. Filtrate is defined as the water after any possible pre-treatment, but before disinfectant is added.

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